The Marae will Rise Again

Sadly, the Marae perished in the early hours of a windy Sunday morning on the 9th June 2019 in a raging fire. The fire was caused by embers from an extinguished bonfire. We were thankful that no lives were lost during this incident. 

We acknowledge the assistance of emergency services, Government and community agencies, Mana Whenua, Wellington City Council and the wider community. We are most grateful to the courageous Fire Fighters from across the region and Fire and Emergency NZ. 

The whānau are determined to rebuild the Marae and nohokāinga (Marae housing). We are overwhelmed with the support we have received through koha donations and offers of help. We embark on a journey to plan the rebuild of a new Marae and Nohokāinga. Please follow us on Facebook to be part of our journey. 

Ahi Kā - a Place of Gathering

Pepeha

Ko Tawatawa te Maunga 
Ko ngā waka o ngā hau e whā Ngā Waka 
 Ko te Manawa Karioi te Puna 
 Ko Ūkaipo nō Mahinārangi me Pare Waaka ngā Whare Tīpuna 
 Ko Hirini te Tangata Ko Tapu Te Ranga te Marae 

Tawatawa is the mountain 
The people of the four winds are the waka 
Manawa Karioi is the spring 
Ūkaipo of Mahinārangi and Pare Waaka are the ancestoral houses 
Hirini is the Rangatira 
Tapu Te Ranga is the Marae
Tapu Te Ranga Marae stood proudly. A living, urban Marae founded by Bruce Stewart and his whānau (family). The Tapu Te Ranga Trust has overseen the charitable programmes and kaupapa at the Marae since the 1970's. This Wellington tāonga (treasure) is open and shared with people from ngā hau e whā (people from the four winds). The Marae was a place of gathering, learning and community. She is a strong social, artistic, cultural and environmental statement of living Māori in today's world. 

Wellington, Te Whanganui-a-Tara is the rohe (area) of Te Ātiawa and Ngāti Toa Rangatira. The Marae is named after Island Bay’s coastal Island 'Tapu Te Ranga' (sacred rising). Elsdon Best wrote that the name is derived from an ancient Hawaiki tapu house name. Ngāti Ira used the island as a pā (fortified village) and it is believed that Kupe was on the island when he sighted a giant octopus. 

The heritage-listed building was the world’s largest, tallest, greenest and fully wooden house on wooden piles built of recycled materials. The building consisted of 11 stories, covering 38,000 square feet and reaching 131 feet high. Manuhiri (visitors) from right across the world have been embraced by the openness and warmth of the Marae. 

Documented on Film


Documentary - Whenua Films (2015) 
A documentary by Keely Skinner.


Te Marae - A Journey of Discovery (1992) 
Tapu Te Ranga Marae is the last feature in this documentary, starting at 8.5 minutes.

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